National Day of Mourning

The Day of Mourning is an annual day of remembrance for workers who have been killed and injured on the job. The aim of this day is to publicly renew the commitment to continue our efforts for the safety of all workers as well as pay our respects for those workers who have died in occupational accidents.

The National Day of Mourning, held annually on April 28, was officially recognized by the federal government in 1991, eight years after the day of remembrance was launched by our Canadian Labour Congress (CLC). The Day of Mourning has since spread to more than 80 countries around the world and has been adopted by the AFL-CIO and the International Confederation of Free Trade Unions.

On April 28, we remember and commemorate workers whose lives have been lost and workers that have been injured in the workplace and recommit to the challenge of preventing and eliminating workplace deaths and injuries; observing this day will strengthen the resolve to establish safe conditions in the workplace for all of us. It is as much a day to remember those fallen as it is a call to protect the living; therefore we must breathe new life into efforts aimed at securing safer and healthier workplaces.

So just a reminder to mark the ‘Day’ tomorrow, Tuesday, April 28th, by flying flags at half-mast; wear ribbons or black armbands, or whatever your traditional vigils/ceremonies are and observe moments of silence together with your family, friends and co-workers.